Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The Limits of Meaning: Case Studies in the Anthropology of Christianity file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The Limits of Meaning: Case Studies in the Anthropology of Christianity book. Happy reading The Limits of Meaning: Case Studies in the Anthropology of Christianity Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The Limits of Meaning: Case Studies in the Anthropology of Christianity at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF The Limits of Meaning: Case Studies in the Anthropology of Christianity Pocket Guide.

Describe the connection issue. SearchWorks Catalog Stanford Libraries.

Materiality: An Introduction

The limits of meaning : case studies in the anthropology of Christianity. Responsibility edited by Matthew Engelke and Matt Tomlinson.

Case Study

Imprint New York : Berghahn Books, Physical description vi, pages ; 24 cm. Online Available online.


  1. Article Metrics?
  2. Navigation menu?
  3. ONE MAN AND HIS SHED;
  4. Wie man sich und anderen das Leben schwer macht: Tipps für jeden Tag (German Edition)?
  5. Ingie Hovland _ Blog: Toward an anthropology of Christianity.
  6. The Limits of Meaning: Case Studies in the Anthropology of Christianity — Monash University?
  7. Similar books and articles.

Full view. SAL3 off-campus storage.

Engelke, Matthew (editor); Tomlinson, Matt (editor)

C8 L55 Available. More options.

Find it at other libraries via WorldCat Limited preview. Annual Meeting st : : New Orleans, La.

Information

Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index. Summary Too often, anthropological accounts of ritual leave readers with the impression that everything goes smoothly, that rituals are "meaningful events. Drawing on research in the anthropology of Christianity from around the globe, the authors in this volume suggest that in order to analyze meaning productively, we need to consider its limits. This collection is a welcome new addition to the anthropology of religion, offering fresh debates on a classic topic and drawing attention to meaning in a way that other volumes have for key terms like "culture" and "fieldwork.

Materiality: An Introduction | UCL Anthropology - UCL - London's Global University

Post a Comment. Friday, October 3, Toward an anthropology of Christianity. I've just read and enjoyed John Barker's recent book review essay in the latest issue of American Anthropologist vol , no 3 , "Toward an anthropology of Christianity".


  1. Plank Grilling: 75 Recipes for Infusing Food with Flavor Using Wood Planks!
  2. Testament.
  3. Historical and literary studies.
  4. Stanford Libraries.
  5. Recent Posts.

This is a significant move, not so much because it legitimates the historical and ethnographic study of Christianity within the discipline - that battle has largely been won - but because it suggests that anthropology can provide a unique perspective. In other words, the authors combine ethnographic study of Christian communities, practices and meanings with larger questions. In Cannell's edited volume, the larger questions circle around themes such as conversion, words and things.

I especially liked the chapters by Simon Coleman and Fenella Cannell on the use of words recitation, speaking, reading, writing , combined with the use of material things in the process notes, books, gifts. Their focus is on Christian communities in Sweden and the Philippines respectively.

The Limits of Meaning: Case Studies in the Anthropology of Christianity

I've already written a post on Engelke and Tomlinson's edited volume. The themes that come out strongly in their volume are meaning and ritual. And at some point I should write a separate post on Webb Keane. His work examines the relationship between subjects, objects, and language. In particular he looks at how Protestant Christians in Indonesia draw moral boundaries around themselves as modern subjects through constructing proper relationships to language and to objects around them.